Dirt in the Skirt for a Good Cause

With my upcoming book release next month for Nola Fran Evie, which is about three women in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, I thought this was a perfect current event to share with you guys.

I stumbled across an awesome news story courtesy of the AAGPBL Players Association’s Facebook page.

Yesterday the San Rafael Pacifics, an independent professional baseball team, wore replicas of the Rockford Peaches historic uniforms during a game to honor Breast Cancer survivors.

And, yes. They were men in darling pink dresses…

Photo Credit: Ballpark Digest

Photo Credit: Ballpark Digest

We’ve seen men in professional sports support Breast Cancer Awareness with different pink accessories—gloves, cleats, hats—but never before have they played like this!

They are the first men’s professional baseball team in history to wear dresses. Love it!

Two of the uniforms were autographed by Academy Award winner Tom Hanks, who starred in one of my all-time favorite movies and the reason I was obsessed with the women’s league from a young age, “A League of Their Own”. They were auctioned off with proceeds going to a breast cancer foundation in California called “To Celebrate Life”.

This was a very cool way to honor these women—the brave gals who played in the All-American Girls Professional League seventy years ago and the courageous women battling Breast Cancer today. I applaud these men for dressing up and getting some “dirt in the skirt”.

As many of you know, back in February I found out that my mom was battling her second stint with Breast Cancer. If you missed the posts, you can read about the experience here “This one’s for you, Mom” and here “We Surpass the Tough”.

My mom is doing beautifully.

She “got lucky” with Stage 1, but the emotional scars are just as challenging as the physical ones, and she’s still on a very challenging journey to healing. But, as I’ve said before, she’s a trooper and she’ll kick ass as she always does.

I don’t think we can ever raise enough awareness for Breast Cancer, so I was delighted to see a fresh take on a good cause with these ball players. I’m sure my mom will be tickled when she reads this as she recovers from one of her final surgeries this week.

If you want to check out the full story, there’s a good one right here on Yahoo Sports.

And just for fun, I wanted to leave you all with a few photos of the gals of the All-American Girls Baseball League wearing the original uniforms from 1948. I especially love the pic of the girls huddled around the magazine together.

(All images are courtesy of Florida Memory.)

Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

Photo Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

Credit this photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

Credit this photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

  You may have noticed I added a little countdown on the sidebar for the big book release. Twenty-four days to go…woot!!!

Nola Fran Evie Book Release

 

 

31 thoughts on “Dirt in the Skirt for a Good Cause

  1. Carrie Rubin says:

    That guy pulls off that pink dress beautifully! They’re good sports to do that. So glad your mom is doing well. I wish her luck with her surgery. My mother is also having surgery next week. We’ll think positive thoughts together. 🙂

    • Britt Skrabanek says:

      I knew you’d like that pic, Carrie! He did a fine job and I thought they were all quite manly to participate.

      Good luck to your mom as well. We will totally combine the power of our positive thoughts.

  2. diannegray says:

    I love seeing the guys promoting breast cancer awareness. In Australia they wear pink shirts while playing football and cricket.

    I was going to ask about your mum, but feared it may not be appropriate. I’m so relieved she’s doing well! My mother is also doing well and is in remission from Multiple Myeloma. It’s certainly an interesting journey and a rollercoaster-type ride xxxx

    • Britt Skrabanek says:

      Isn’t it fantastic?! Every time I see it, even on TV with the football teams here, I get teary-eyed.

      I’ve been meaning to give my blogging family a mum update, but I wanted to make sure the coast was clear with all of the surgeries. Glad your mom is doing so awesome…that’s wonderful, honey!

  3. Letizia says:

    Love the man in the pink skirt – he wears it well! So glad to hear your mother is recovering well and I wish her the best in her final surgeries!

  4. Roy McCarthy says:

    I’m fascinated by the evolution of women in sport. A women’s foot race was pretty much a novelty event at one time, and women’s team sports were far and few between and frowned upon. In England women’s soccer was hugely popular from 1917 up until 1921 until women were banned from using most grounds, the game being deemed ‘unsuitable for females’. The ban was only lifted in 1971.

    Looking forward to your ‘take’ and best wishes to Mum.

    • Mary Jo Malo says:

      In the spirit of competitive sports rampant on the streets in front of bars in my neighborhood, I’m shocked that women in the U.K. were banned from soccer until 1971. This puts the American dames of baseball truly in a ‘league of their own.’

      Brittney, please offer my best wishes, thoughts & prayers to your Mom. Having had the privilege of meeting her, and recently learning of her victorious struggles, I see now where you get your sass and spirit. Go Mom!

      • Britt Skrabanek says:

        Isn’t that insane, MJ?! Of course our American gals, though not banned, were left high and dry when the leagues went under in 1954. Crazy that the movie “A League of Their Own” resurrected the league in a way.

        Thank you for all of your sweet words about my mom. I’ll pass them along. (Go mom!)

    • Britt Skrabanek says:

      That’s so interesting, Roy! I had no idea about women’s soccer in England. Funny that the crowds didn’t seem to mind the sport being “unsuitable for females” during the years of popularity.

      • Roy McCarthy says:

        Hi Britt, no the crowds didn’t mind – they used to roll up in their thousands. A lot of it was novelty value but it would surely have grown alongside the men’s game if allowed to. It was the (totally male) Football Association that issued the ban and the women’s game thereafter only existed on the fringes until the 1970’s.

        It’s only in recent years that the English women’s game has recovered to match the more enlightened USA and Scandinavian regimes.

  5. Karin Van den Bergh says:

    Go guys!! They pulled off a great stunt! All the best to your mom Britt. So good to hear she’s doing better. So Love the vintage photo’s! 🙂

  6. Minuscule Moments says:

    Britt what an encouraging story, we all know someone effected by this disease and I am happy your mother is making a full recovery. You should be very proud of yourself with the accomplishment of finishing a novel you inspire me to keep at it thank you.

    • Britt Skrabanek says:

      Unfortunately, we all do seem to know someone. That’s why I decided to share my family’s experience, even though it was tough since it was so personal. But it does help to know that we are not alone, doesn’t it?

      Kath, thank you. We all know how tough it is to keep at this writing thing. Glad to have such a supportive community to keep me going as well!

    • Britt Skrabanek says:

      Thanks, Gail love! That countdown is a little nerve-wracking for me to look at right now, but I’m glad others are excited to watch those days dwindle. I don’t think I’ve ever met someone who doesn’t love that movie. It’s so great, even still!

  7. jmmcdowell says:

    Love the dresses on the men! Kudos to them for helping bring awareness to their fans. My best wishes go to your mother for a speedy recovery. It’s always so heartening to hear stories of beating the cancer odds!

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